Famous people with Asperger syndrome

 

Norm Ledgin in his best seller book, Diagnosing Jefferson, claimed that the genius of America’s third president was cause of Asperger Syndrome.

Untitled1After this book, the author wrote Asperger’s and Self-Esteem: Insight and Hope through Famous Role Models, which claims that thirteen famous people of history in science, art, music, politics and other areas – Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, and Mozart among them-also had Asperger Syndrome. There are some pieces of evidence that Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Charles Darwin, Galileo, Pablo Picasso, Benjamin Franklin, Margaret Mead and Aristotle had Asperger Syndrome.

 

Vernon Smith received the Nobel Prize in 2002 for inventing the field of experimental economics, which uses laboratory methods to test economic theories. Smith believes his ability for deep concentration helped him win the Nobel Prize.
“I don’t have any trouble thinking outside the box,” he said. “I don’t feel any social pressure to do things the way other people are doing them, professionally. And so I have been more open to different ways of looking at a lot of the problems in economics.”

Lovecky , PhD, Therapist and Psychologist notes how Aspies often have large vocabularies, recognize patterns others do not, and pursue ideas in spite of evidence to the contrary, because they are not easily distracted by others’ opinions. Their ability to focus on details leads them to come up with solutions to problems others overlook.